Identifying a Greek precinct

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The Greek community has had an enormous impact on everyday life in Marrickville and Dulwich Hill. We’d like to formally recognise this contribution by identifying a Greek precinct in Marrickville and Dulwich Hill.


Mid 1980s Dimos, Diamandis and George Scoullis in the Hellenic Bakery, now the Hellenic Patisserie and Gelato Bar Courtesy of the Scoullis family from Vasilios Vasilas


In the 1960s Greek was commonly spoken on the streets and there was high demand for authentic Greek products and experiences – the delicatessen, restaurants, cake shops, clothing stores and the Hellenic Art Theatre, to name a few.

Jump forward to present day – the independently run Greek Festival continues each year and you’ll see the influence of Hellenic culture and businesses in the area. The demographics of Marrickville and Dulwich Hill may be changing, but their influence in academia, the arts, construction and business is still present locally and across Sydney.


Have your say

Where is the heart of a Greek precinct?

There are many places that are significant to the Greek community. Drop a pin on the interactive map to share what you know or your memories of each place. We’ll use these pins and the Guidelines for the Determination of Place Names to connect the precinct.


What should we call the precinct?

We appreciate that Hellenic culture has spread around the world for centuries and is not necessarily just from Greece. What name do you think would be appropriate and why?


Have your say in a format that is right for you

We’re committed to ensuring everyone can provide input in a format that is right for them.

Tell us what you think:

Comments closed Sunday 12 July 2020.


What happens next?

Council staff will review your feedback and will update this page with a summary of what we heard. A recommendation will be presented to the Councillors for a final decision. Everyone who provides input will be contacted when Council considers the recommendation.


The Greek community has had an enormous impact on everyday life in Marrickville and Dulwich Hill. We’d like to formally recognise this contribution by identifying a Greek precinct in Marrickville and Dulwich Hill.


Mid 1980s Dimos, Diamandis and George Scoullis in the Hellenic Bakery, now the Hellenic Patisserie and Gelato Bar Courtesy of the Scoullis family from Vasilios Vasilas


In the 1960s Greek was commonly spoken on the streets and there was high demand for authentic Greek products and experiences – the delicatessen, restaurants, cake shops, clothing stores and the Hellenic Art Theatre, to name a few.

Jump forward to present day – the independently run Greek Festival continues each year and you’ll see the influence of Hellenic culture and businesses in the area. The demographics of Marrickville and Dulwich Hill may be changing, but their influence in academia, the arts, construction and business is still present locally and across Sydney.


Have your say

Where is the heart of a Greek precinct?

There are many places that are significant to the Greek community. Drop a pin on the interactive map to share what you know or your memories of each place. We’ll use these pins and the Guidelines for the Determination of Place Names to connect the precinct.


What should we call the precinct?

We appreciate that Hellenic culture has spread around the world for centuries and is not necessarily just from Greece. What name do you think would be appropriate and why?


Have your say in a format that is right for you

We’re committed to ensuring everyone can provide input in a format that is right for them.

Tell us what you think:

Comments closed Sunday 12 July 2020.


What happens next?

Council staff will review your feedback and will update this page with a summary of what we heard. A recommendation will be presented to the Councillors for a final decision. Everyone who provides input will be contacted when Council considers the recommendation.


Stories of Greek culture in Marrickville and Dulwich hill

Join Peggy and share your story and experiences on Greek culture, business and presence in Marrickville and Dulwich Hill.

You can share text, images or upload a video of yourself telling the story or support a friend or family member to do so. 

As well as your stories, please tell us

  • What is an appropriate  name for the precinct?
  • Places of Greek cultural significance in Marrickville and Dulwich Hills
  • Ideas on how to identify and celebrate the precinct

Format information*  

Photo format: Jpeg
Quality: High Quality
Size: 2MB-10MB
Provide a caption or brief explanation in the title box
Add the photographer's name 

Video format: MP4
Length: Up to 2 minutes
Provide a caption or brief explanation in the title box
Add the videographer's name

Text only story
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Add the author's name

*We ask for the name so your material is properly attributed to you in the public archive. We may contact you to find out more information.

This project is monitored and we will not publish material which contravenes the Terms and Conditions.  Inappropriate comments will be removed in line with the Moderation policy.



Thank you for sharing your story with us.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    No to a Greek Precinct

    by Jamie321, 8 days ago


    This is not a ‘story’ as you have all fabricated this Have Your Say page into and I will also be ringing to voice my opposition to this and will be encouraging many others to do so.. I completely and utterly disagree with a precinct in this area being labeled as Greek, let alone any other culture. Dulwich Hill is multicultural, and it already has its Greek influence seen in many businesses such as under The Cooperage, the library, the jewellers, the physio, and hair/beauticians.
    Most buildings in this area are Greek owned, or managed by people of Greek background... Continue reading

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    From the Greek island of Rhodes to Dulwich Hill

    by Peggy Dulwich Hill, 27 days ago


    Peggy moved to Sydney with her family from the Greek Island of Rhodes when she was 3 years old in 1952. After staying with her grandparents in Surry Hills for six months, her parents opened a mixed business in Glebe. It was difficult for them as they didn’t know the language so her Dad went to night school to learn the English language to help him in the business. After 3 or 4 years they sold the business and moved the family to Dulwich Hill where her parents opened another mixed business. The mixed business consisted of fruit and vegetables... Continue reading