1. What are the benefits of laneways?

Laneways are an important part of the Marrickville environment. They provide connections to other streets, access to properties and additional street parking. To maximise these benefits, laneways need to be used effectively. Issues sometimes arise when cars parked in narrow laneways prevent access to properties or block garbage trucks and other vehicles.


2. Why were the Laneway Parking Guidelines developed?

Through a recent parking study, the community told us that competition for parking space in Marrickville has increased significantly. They also said that this led to cars being parked in narrow laneways which sometimes caused problems with accessing properties or driving through laneways. These guidelines have been developed to address the community’s concerns and effectively manage the use of laneways.

3. What are the priorities for using laneway space?

Laneways can be used for a variety of purposes which are listed below in order of priority:

  1. Access for emergency vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists

  2. Access for garbage collection trucks and deliveries where required

  3. Access to existing off-street  parking within properties

  4. Accessible parking for people with disabilities where appropriate

  5. Parking where space is available and access is maintained.

This list of priorities helps Council decide whether parking is permitted in a laneway because it determines how much space is required for the most important uses.

4. How does Council decide if a laneway can be used for parking?

Council has developed guidelines to provide a consistent approach when assessing the need for parking controls in laneways.  The guidelines are based on the road width between kerbs to ensure access is maintained. 

Parking restrictions to prevent parking near driveways could be considered on a case-by-case basis.

The process for assessing laneways for parking restrictions is:

  • Assess the laneway width and confirm conditions through a site visit.

  • Assess the need to ban parking across and near driveways.

  • Prepare a concept parking plan.

  • Get community feedback about the proposed plan.

  • After considering submissions received from the community, prepare a report for Council’s Pedestrian, Cyclist and Traffic Calming Advisory Committee with a recommendation to Council on the proposed parking changes. 

  • Install parking signs approved by Council and notify those who sent a submission.

5. There is a narrow laneway near my home. Why aren’t there any signs to ban parking?

Council’s preference is for residents to negotiate with each other to avoid the unnecessary implementation of parking bans. 

Where problems occur, parking restrictions can be considered for individual laneways on a case-by-case basis, using the laneway parking guidelines.

6. Can parking fines be issued even where signs aren’t installed to ban parking?

Yes, parking fines can be issued where there is an infringement of the NSW Road Rules, even if signs aren’t installed. Examples of this include:

  • At street intersections - vehicles must not park within the first 10metres (two car lengths) along the kerb from an intersection as this is strictly a “No Stopping” zone. 
  • Across driveways - It is illegal to park across a property driveway.

However many issues covered by the NSW Road Rules require signs to be installed before a fine can be issued. An example of this is where a car parks opposite a driveway, blocking access to a property. In this instance a sign may need to be installed.

7. The laneway near my home is less than 3.9 metres between kerbs. Can the laneway be used for parking?

No.  Parking is not permitted in a narrow laneway less than 3.9 metres wide because this would block access for vehicles using the laneway.

8. The laneway near my home is between 3.9 and 4.9 metres between kerbs. Can it be used for parking?

Parking for cars and vans would be permitted on at least one side of the road with parking restrictions between 5am and 10am on garbage collection days to allow access for garbage trucks. 

Parking for delivery trucks is not permitted as a parked truck would block access to other traffic using the laneway.

Parking is not permitted across and opposite driveways where it would block access.  Parking restrictions to prevent parking near driveways could be considered on a case-by-case basis. 

9. The laneway near my home is wider than 4.9 metres between kerbs. Can it be used for parking?

Parking would be permitted on at least one side of the road. 

Parking is not permitted across and opposite driveways where it would block access.  Parking restrictions to prevent parking near driveways could be considered on a case-by-case basis.